Author of Two Amazon #1 Best Selling Cookbooks

Posts Tagged » organic

Vote With Your Cup: Drink Happiness

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Nov 13, 2015 health , , , 0 Comments

As individual people, it is easy to forget the collective impact we have with our purchases. “Does my dollar really make a difference?” is a question we often ask when deciding between a small brand we’ve never heard of or a larger one we “trust.” We rarely pause to reflect that our spending greatly impacts the lives of others throughout the planet. This holds particularly true with purchases for items that involve slave and child labor; we are so removed from the origins of what we consume, it seldom crosses our minds to consider whose life created our purchase.

As the Starbucks red-cup story hit the news this week, I was shocked and a bit appalled that for all the talk about Christmas and freedom, nowhere in the conversation did the topic arise of how awful Starbucks actual PRODUCT is. There are several reasons we shouldn’t be giving our money to Starbucks: their coffee is the result of child slave labor, their dairy is GMO & hormane laden / antibiotic filled, and they don’t use organic beans. You may not be aware that coffee is actually one of the most pesticided items on the planet.

When you want your next latte, why not try out a local shop that uses fair trade, organic beans and local– or at least organic– dairy? Wouldn’t you rather know that in drinking a cup of coffee, you’re helping others in foreign countries make a living, instead of suffer? And wouldn’t you rather enjoy a drink that wasn’t filled with 250 lbs of chemicals per acre? Currently, Starbucks says that most of their coffee is “ethically sourced” through a program they themselves created– about 90%— yet only 3% of their coffee is fair trade certified by the actual, real, fair trade organizations who are NOT part of Starbucks. And as for organic, about 3% of the coffee is.

Let’s make the conversation one that actually matters: it’s what’s IN your cup that you should be devoting your thoughts, and your money to. If you oppose slave labor and factory farming, vote with your coffee purchase, no matter what color the cup is, and choose to drink happiness.



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Getting High… via Vegan Paleo Mocha Chip Ice Cream

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Aug 12, 2014 gluten free recipes (pls note that all raw/vegan recipes are GF- these are predominantly cooked recipes) , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 1 Comment

Some people are content to see the world exactly as they view it through their eyes and call it a day, every day.  Other people yearn for more: brighter colors, deeper feelings, cosmic connection.  I’ve always been the latter, and even as a small child I did things to get “high,” like push on my eyeballs with my fingers because it made me see flashes of pretty colors.  I have multiple memories of my mother scolding at me to stop that,  it can hurt your eyes.  It became a late-at-night (read: after 8 pm bedtime) pleasure, pretty much until I was old enough to smoke pot and moved on to that instead.  My college years were spent seeing A LOT OF PRETTY COLORS on a regular basis, and in the many years since my UC Santa Cruz haze, aka since “growing up” (while remaining a rainbow haired tattooed girl in DIY torn up tank tops), I’ve transitioned to finding euphoria in everything from farmers markets to herbal tonics.

Just because tonic herbs are legal, doesn’t mean they can’t get you crazy blissed out.  Beyond that, of course, are their myriad health benefits, which include everything from reversing gray hair (thank you, he shou wu!!) to helping your body better adapt to stress.  The only real issue I ever had with herbal tonics is the fact that though they are best absorbed eaten as a food rather than taken as a pill, they tend to taste pretty nasty.  Enter Longevity Power, purveyors of outrageously effective– and delightfully palatable– premium quality herbs.

When I first tried LP’s “Levity,” which is an extract of red asparagus root (not related to normal asparagus, the veggie), I seriously felt like I was back in Santa Cruz partying like the type of rock star I am way too old to make my body be these days.  It tastes like caramel, and it feels like ecstasy.  And it totally helps your body adapt to stress, to boot.  Add to that their Epic Reishi, which has an espresso flavor and provides support for your immune system, liver, and nervous system, and what do you get?  Well, if you’re a culinary creative, you get ICE CREAM.  Killer joyful mocha ice cream that is crazy good for you, being made predominantly of avocado and sweet potato, and is both vegan AND paleo, in addition to low glycemic.  It is also super easy to make, the most difficult aspect of it being the do-ahead roasted sweet potato, and no one will know it isn’t full of dairy, soy, or anything processed at all.  Because ice cream, like everything else, deserves to make you feel really, really good inside.

 

Magic Mocha Chip Ice Cream

1 small roasted sweet potato (any color)
1 avocado
1 1/2 cups coconut milk or other thick milk
1/4 cup raw cacao powder or cocoa powder
2 tbls coconut nectar, or honey if not vegan
3 tbls Levity
1 1/2 tsp Epic Reishi
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 tsp chocolate extract
3/4 tsp salt
stevia to taste: I like Sweet Drops toffee and use 2 droppers full

Blend all ingredients in a high powered blender until smooth. If you don’t have a high powered blender like a Vitamix, add additional milk as needed.
This is awesome eaten straight from the blender as a pudding, especially if you add a couple tbls of coconut oil before blending. But if you want to persevere and take it a step further to the land of frozen summer happiness, just chill the mixture until cold (about 1/2 an hour in the fridge, presuming your roasted sweet potato was cooled off) and then process in an ice cream maker.
Add 1/2 cup cacao nibs or chocolate chips, or some of each, at the very end, and freeze until firm.
Serve with a sprinkle of extra reishi on top and subsequently confound your friends and loved ones when you give them some then let them in on the fact that the tastiest mocha ice cream they’ve ever had has not a drop of dairy, soy, or coffee in it. Whole foods and superfoods take the cake– hell, they take the whole dessert– every time.

 



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You’re Gonna Go Nuttzo For These No-Bake Granola Bars

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May 1, 2014 gluten free recipes (pls note that all raw/vegan recipes are GF- these are predominantly cooked recipes) , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 2 Comments

I’m not generally much of an in-between kind of girl. My hair is black, or it’s white. (Or, currently, it’s black and magenta, which is, again, kind of serious looking, in a really fun and unserious way.) Either I’m working 20 days in a row, or I’m twiddling my thumbs for equally as long. I’m in love with and deeply attracted to extremes, in all facets of life. In line with my character, I vacillate between making the most ridiculously complex food ever, and the simplest. Lucky for you, dear reader, today I came up with a granola bar that is stupid easy and also AMAZINGLY tasty. Better yet, it’s gluten free, grain free, paleo, high protein, and vegan. These would be good with any nut or seed butter, but the chocolate Nuttzo adds a killer dessert-y flavor, plus a bunch of nutrients and omegas via flax seeds.

To make these awesome little guys, throw all of the below in a bowl, stir until combined, pour in a pan, and put in the fridge or freezer. Get back to it in an hour, cut into bars, and knock yourself the hell out never buying granola bars again.

1 cup nuts (I used raw almonds), whole or broken, doesn’t matter
1 cup coconut flakes (exchange for dried fruit if you don’t like coconut)
1 cup sprouted dried buckwheat (buckwheat is a seed, not a grain, fyi, and it’s now delightfully inexpensive sprouted and dried in the bulk section of health food stores)
3/4 cup chocolate Nuttzo
3/4 cup date puree (puree dates, or buy dates pureed)
1/2 cup cacao nibs
1/2 cup coconut nectar, honey, or maple syrup
3 scoops protein powder of choice
1 tsp salt
1 tsp vanilla

Like I said: mix together until it’s all gloppy and uniform, spread in a pan, and refrigerate. That’s it. If you have no patience, like me, put them in the freezer and they’ll be ready in a half hour. If you have patience, put them in the fridge and it’ll be more like an hour or two. Keep them in the fridge so they stay hard until eaten, or keep frozen if you plan on having one as a grab-n-go snack later in the day.

The buckwheat gives these a Rice Krispie treat texture, so I wouldn’t omit that, but beyond that you can basically change out any ingredients here you want to keep flavors current. Add dried fruit, add more nuts, change the nuts, change the protein powder, add cocoa powder, do whatever you want because you’re not baking these so you’ve got nothing to worry about. What you see is what you’ll get when you make the batter, only it will firm up a bit once cold. If by some change you add too much stuff and the mixture isn’t spreadable, just add more nut butter until it is, and taste to make sure they’re still sweet and salty enough.



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Round Two: A Variation of Last Week’s Raw Vegan Cherry Berry Chocolate Cream Pie

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May 30, 2012 raw vegan recipes , , , , , , , , , , 2 Comments

This week I want to recreate the cherry-berry pie I made last week, but thought it would benefit from a fruity pudding layer in addition to the chocolate one.  I dried and reconstituted the fruit in a similar fashion (and used an extra cup of cherries so the pie was more full), but instead of just the chocolate avocado mousse, I made a raspberry mousse, then added cocoa powder and chocolate protein powder to about 1/3 of it.  This made a berry-chocolate pudding- if you wanted distinctly different flavors in the layers, you could make both this berry recipe and last week’s chocolate one. The raspberry mousse itself tastes “like a Sweet Tart” according to Ace- the camu camu powder lends a tangy, flavorful note.

This time, I skipped the coconut nectar in the fruit layer; the idea of it had been for glossiness, and you just don’t see enough of the fruit for that to matter. I also changed the crust slightly- the other one was very thin, and I wasn’t terribly keen on the figs.  For flavor and color I added cocoa powder to the crust, as well as a small amount of reserved dried cherries and strawberries.  I like the look and taste of this one better than the last.

For decor, I used fresh blueberries and cacao nibs, and also swirled some of the chocolate mousse into the raspberry layer on top.

Raw Vegan Cherry Berry Chocolate Cream Pie, the Sequel:

Crust:
1 cup raw pecans
2/3 cup raw walnuts
1/2 cup almond meal
4 dates
6 each partially dried (not reconstituted) cherries and strawberry chunks
1/4 cup raw cacao powder
1 tbls coconut sugar
pinch Himalayan salt

Soak dates in warm water for ten minutes. Pulse pecans and walnuts in food processor, then add remaining ingredients and process until a sticky crumb is formed. Press into a pie tin and set aside.
Any other raw pie crust recipe could be subbed for this one, or any other nuts/fruit you prefer.

Cherry Berry Filling:
2 cups strawberries, cut into 3/4 inch chunks
5 cups cherries, pitted

Place cherries and strawberries onto a dehydrator tray (fruit should fill one tray) and dry at 108 degrees for about eight hours. Refrigerate until ready to use. To prep for pie, reconstitute by covering them in warm water for about ten minutes. Drain and squeeze gently, then mix in coconut nectar.

Raspberry Mousse:

2 large or 3 small avocados
1 small banana
1 cup raspberries (fresh or frozen)
3/4 cup buckwheat honey, coconut nectar or agave OR 2/3 cup water and 2 droppers liquid stevia
3 tbls beet juice for color
3 tbls lucuma powder
1 tsp camu camu powder

Blend until creamy. Remove 2/3 of mix and set aside.

Cacao Mousse:
1/3 raspberry mousse recipe
1/4 cup raw cacao powder
2 scoops chocolate protein powder

Blend until creamy, and thin with water if needed.

Assembly:

Place a thin layer of raspberry mousse on top of the crust, followed by a thin layer of chocolate mousse. Throughly strain the cherries and strawberries, and add them. Top with all but about 3 tbls of chocolate mousse (or all of it if you don’t want to use it for decorating), then with remaining raspberry mousse. Decorate as desired.










Pie Time! Raw Vegan Fresh Cherry Berry Chocolate Cream Pie

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May 22, 2012 raw vegan recipes , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

My cherry obsession continues, only now they are FINALLY briefly in season, so currently I’m getting my fill of actual live cherries, not frozen or dried ones.  Though not a “pie person” per say, I greatly enjoy raw apple pie, where you partially dehydrate sliced apples then reconstitute them so they acquire a slightly smooshy baked quality.  I decided to carry that technique over to fresh cherries and strawberries, and layer it with a raw food staple: cacao avocado mousse.  If you have some time of your hands, this is the perfect summer recipe to try!  I made the chocolate mousse/pudding a couple days ago (and we’ve been enjoying plenty of it on its own), dried the fruit yesterday, and made the crust/assembled the whole thing today.  Having done it in parts, the actual crust-making and full pie assembly took less than a half hour.

Note that the cacao mousse recipe is for a full multi-serving yield… because really, if you are gonna dirty your blender, you might as well have a couple days worth of pudding to show for it! Also, you can make it without adding any fruit- I thought it’d be great for the chocolate layer to have notes of cherry.


Raw Vegan Fresh Cherry Berry Chocolate Cream Pie

Crust:
1 cup raw pecans
1/2 cup almond meal
5 dates
5 dried figs
pinch Himalayan salt

Soak dates and figs in warm water for ten minutes. Pulse pecans in food processor, then add remaining ingredients and process until a sticky crumb is formed. Press into a pie tin and set aside.
Any other raw pie crust recipe could be subbed for this one, or any other nuts/fruit you prefer.

Cherry Berry Filling:
2 cups strawberries, cut into 3/4 inch chunks
4 cups cherries, pitted
1/4 cup coconut nectar

Place cherries and strawberries onto a dehydrator tray (fruit should nearly fill one tray) and dry at 108 degrees for about eight hours. Refrigerate until ready to use. To prep for pie, reconstitute by covering them in warm water for about ten minutes. Drain and squeeze gently, then mix in coconut nectar.

Cacao Avocado Mousse:
3 extra large avocados or 4-5 medium ones
1 heaping cup cherries, pitted
3/4 cup coconut nectar, buckwheat honey, or agave OR 2/3 cup water and 2 droppers liquid stevia
1/3 cup cacao powder
1/4 cup coconut oil
2 scoops chocolate protein powder (optional)
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 tsp Himalayan salt

Blend in VitaMix or other high-powered blender until smooth and creamy. Refrigerate until ready to use.

To Assemble:
Place a thin layer of cacao mousse along the bottom of the crust. Drain any excess liquid from fruit, and pour in. Add about two cups of cacao mousse on top, until fruit barely peeps through- more can be added if desired.

Decor:
I used a pint of raspberries, and about 1/4 cup of cacao nibs for a topping. You can decorate any way you choose; I placed the raspberries around the edge, and made a sort of flower out of them by taking several berries and flattening them, then laying each around one main berry. I then put a small mint leaf in the center of the whole raspberry.





 






The REAL PowerBall: Raw Vegan Sugar-Free Soy-Free Grain-Free Gluten-Free High-Protein Chocolate Cherry Cookie Dough Truffles

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May 1, 2012 raw vegan recipes , , , , , , , , , , 2 Comments

I may feel like hell, I may have yet to find out if the brain damage from being chemically poisoned for the last six months plus is permanent or fully recoverable, and I may have an MRI in the morning so a neurologist can view said prospective brain damage that is scaring the hell out of my little claustrophobic self, but that doesn’t mean I can’t still be as much of a trooper as possible and play in the kitchen experimenting with new desserts!

The two raw cookie dough ball recipes (chocolate chip and oatmeal) I’ve made were good enough to warrant a new version, this time with the leftover dried tart cherries I had from the fruit and nut bars I made last week.  I wanted the cherry flavor again, but I also wanted chocolate.  Additionally, I wanted to stick to just nuts rather than nut flours and butters.  The end result is sort of a LaraBar gone wild… it’s a bit denser than the previous cookie dough balls, but still indulgent and light enough to feel like a cookie.  As I was rolling them I realized these could also be considered truffles, because they take well to toppings like hemp seeds and cacao powder.  I’ve kept with my usual sugar-free theme, but since these contain dried fruit they aren’t particularly candida friendly.  They do have a solid amount of fiber to counteract the sugars in the fruit by way of flax, though.  As always, feel free to simplify as needed or change out any ingredients you don’t care for.

Chocolate Cherry PowerBalls:

2/3 cup dried tart cherries
3 large dates
Soak fruit in warm water for 5-10 minutes, then process in mini-Cuisinart until fairly smooth.

2/3 cup nuts- I used 1/2 almonds and 1/2 walnuts
Process in same mini-processor (no need to wash in between, and you could do them together if desired) until crumbly.

Add:
1/4 cup chocolate protein powder
1/4 cup coconut oil
3 tbls raw cacao powder
3 tbls ground golden flax
2 tbls cacao nibs
1 full dropper chocolate-raspberry flavored stevia
1 tsp vanilla

Mix until combined thoroughly, then either gather into a ball or place on saran wrap and roll into a log. Refrigerate for 30-60 minutes then roll into 3/4 inch balls. If you refrigerated these as a log, they can be sliced into small cookies to save the time of rolling by hand. Delicious, protein-packed, fiber filled, and a healthy chocolate cherry treat either way!

They may not look too different from your average raw treat, but the cherry chocolate combo is heavenly. =)


A Short-List-of-Ingredients Recipe: Yes, It’s Possible For Me!

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Apr 20, 2012 raw vegan recipes , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments

I tend to get complaints that I put a whole lot of different ingredients into the foods I make. The main reason I don’t consider this a problem, or much work, is of course bc I am the one who already has all these ingredients in my kitchen, on hand. Also, my way of cooking is to rapidly throw stuff together and hope it magically works (usually it does), and some people need more structure and time than that. For those people, I imagine my recipes look like a lot of effort, regardless of how many times I advise, “Just throw a bunch of stuff in a bowl! It’ll be great!”

This week my VitaMix broke, and as I await replacement parts in the mail, life is weird, bc it’s something I use more days than not. My mom sent me a blender that goes with the mixer I have, and it arrived yesterday. Excited to make a smoothie this morning, I tried to fit the blender onto the base only to discover that they are not a match. This blender top may go with SOME mixer out there, but it isn’t mine.  I was already geared up for a smoothie and am out of sprouted buckwheat, my other go-to breakfast (a new batch is in the dehydrator right now). I glanced from the freezer to my mini-Cuisinart, and decided to have some quick morning fun. The end result- and by END, I mean about 60 seconds later!- was delectable.

Easy Breakfast Porridge That Takes Longer to Detail Than It Does to Make:
2/3 cup frozen berries, blended on high for 30 seconds in mini food processor
1 scoop protein powder
2 tbls hemp seeds
3 tbls milk of your choice
1 tbls almond butter
dash of stevia if desired
Stir all ingredients together and enjoy! Crunchy, sweet, filling, and gorgeous.

Note: you can buy berries in season, toss them on a baking sheet, and freeze them individually.  They last very well that way.  When buying berries, ALWAYS choose organic!  They have more pesticides per acre than any other food.






A Friendlier Kombucha

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Mar 30, 2012 random reviews , , , , , 0 Comments

I’m a big fan of the famous GTDave’s kombuchas, but yesterday at Erewhon (the only store nearby to get the “classic” version rather than Whole Foods’ weaker “enlightened” line)  I noticed that their price had gone up yet again, this time to $3.99.  Scanning through the other brands, I came across this:





It was cheaper, but it was also smaller; 12 oz instead of 16.  So I looked at the nutrition facts, and was completely shocked that every flavor had only two grams of sugar in the whole bottle.  Even the non-sweetened GT Dave’s have four, and fruity flavors carry 8-10.  They also have about 70-80 calories to a bottle, and Dr. Chao has only 30.  Lastly, Dr. Chao has managed to pull a gram of protein into the mix.  I figured I’d give one a try; flavors ranged from vanilla to ginkgo, and I went for the St. John’s Wort one.

Plain/herbal kombuchas are never exactly oh-my-yumness beverages compared to their fruit counterparts, which I confirmed with this one on first sip.  But a couple drops of stevia later, it’s quite good!  Also a plus over Dave’s is that when I went to their site I saw that they use organic tea and organic sugar for the brewing process.

Dr. Chao also sells vegan coffee drinks, and they aren’t even made with soy- they use almond and coconut milks.  Definitely a brand to look out for!


ExpoWest: What I Loved, Laughed at, and Longed For

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Mar 11, 2012 greenwashing, random reviews , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 1 Comment

The Natural Products Expo in Anaheim, CA is the West Coast’s largest health foods trade show.  It’s been referred to as “CandyLand for adults,” and after attending, I agree heartily with that descriptor.  We went Friday and we were planning on going back today, but unfortunately little Bill is not having a good weekend so we decided to stay home.

On Friday we visited only a fraction of the booths (it’s way too much to take in in one day), meaning my review here is missing the great bulk and majority of exhibitors, and merely highlights some of what stood out to me, both good and bad.  I could have spent the entire day just in the basement, where they keep new products, as those were some of the most interesting ones.  We are all familiar with Amy’s Organics (they had an entire cafe set up) and Zico coconut water, so it was much more interesting to me to see smaller and newer companies.  It was also fascinating to learn how little or how much the demo reps for the brands knew about the people they were hired to present!  Some were incredibly well-versed in their brands, while others didn’t have even a minimal clue about what they were trying to sell and couldn’t answer even the simplest questions.

My favorite new finds:





Comvita was sampling their manuka honey and olive leaf extract.  They sell manuka honeys with 20+ umf levels, which are the highest you can generally find.  Umf stands for unique manuka factor, and represents the level of antibiotic properties in the honey.  Manuka honey is used by the Maori tribe of New Zealand, and has been used historically for its antibiotic, antibacterial, and antimicrobial qualities.  It was even approved recently for use in hospitals to treat antbiotic-resistant MRSA, a terrible form of staph.

Comvita’s olive leaf extract liquid is unique in that it is made of fresh olive leaves, not dried like the capsules I take to keep Lyme in remission.  It was peppermint flavored and while not tasty, was palatable.  I plan on ordering it because it is more bioavailable than capsules, as well as more potent.





Inner-eco sells coconut kefir, which in the past I have found too awful tasting to ever get used to.  I made it myself for a spell, but could never get past its vinegary smell and flavor.  Through the addition of stevia and natural flavors, Inner-eco has rendered the very healthy probiotic beverage delightful.  While I am not a fan of natural flavors in general, if they make coconut kefir tasty, I’m completely on board.





One brand I’d been looking forward to trying at the Expo was Swerve Sweeteners, which is a form of erythritol that they claim tastes as sweet as sugar; erythritol usually never gets beyond 70% sweetness.  Alas, I never noticed their booth, but I did find Eco-BeeCo, a blend of erythritol, stevia, maltodextrin and honey with a pronounced honey flavor.  I’m not very well read on maltodextrin, so I don’t have an opinion on it, but it’s good to know that there are options for cup-for-cup baking, especially with honey flavor.  However, I couldn’t find any info about where they source the honey from on their site, so I am unlikely to buy this and am more just throwing it out there for people looking for other sugar free options besides the commercially popular TruVia.

Brands that I got fun samples from and enjoyed speaking with:





Redmond RealSalt, unlike Himalayan salt, is an American product.  It comes from what was an ancient sea in Central Utah, and was discovered by Native Americans in 1959.  It contains over 60 trace minerals, and I’ve been using it quite happily for about two years.  When I say “Himalayan salt” in recipes, I mean RealSalt, I’ve just never bothered discussing it before.  The adorable little shakers they gave away of it should be able to sway anyone!  It’s cheaper than Himalayan salt, supports the American economy, and is equally healthful.  And pink.  Because, really, pink is important.





SunWarrior raw vegan protein powder is something I’d wanted to try for awhile, so the ability to both sample a pre-made shake as well as take a packet for later was fun.  I enjoyed their shake a lot, and not just because it had banana in it and I’m completely sugar-starved on a candida cleanse.  Yesterday morning I used the packet at home in a shake along with sugar-free So Delicious coconut milk, baby spinach, and ice.  It is the first raw vegan protein I’ve found that isn’t chalky at all, and I definitely plan on ordering it from iHerb once I’m running low on my current powder.  Pictured on top is an “ancient grains” granola that I unfortunately threw out the packaging for before photographing.  And, of course, that’s Chessie giving it her seal (or, well, mouth) of approval.





While I’ve never used Mountain Rose Herbs before, now that I’ve scored a slew of awesome bumper stickers from them, I’m inclined to give them a try.  Other ones I got where the typical “Support Organic Farmers,” “I <3 Herbs!” and “The Best Things in Life Are Organic.” The reps were friendly, and I wish they’d had some actual product samples.

Companies that would’ve been better served having reps who knew their products:

The first question that I, and several other attendees at this booth at the same time asked, was, “How is this product different from almond milk?” The reps for Victoria’s Kitchen had no idea what almond milk was, or how it was made.  In fact, they didn’t even seem too sure what “almond water” was, either.  The employee kept stating, “It has no milk,” as if almond milk contained dairy.  This product is sugar water with almond flavoring.  Not a health food in the slightest, this beverage contains 30 grams of sugar in a 16 oz bottle and has no nutritive value of any type.





We stopped at the futurebiotics booth wondering if the white kindey bean extract they had on display was for kidneys.  (It isn’t, it’s a carb blocker.) We use this brand’s probiotic, and I recognized the packaging so I asked her a question about that product.  The rep had no idea they even sold a probiotic supplement.  Shouldn’t people at least be given a list of all the company’s supplements, even if only a few are on display?





These people were sampling their ActiveX protein bars they said were, “raw, vegan, and organic.” I looked at the ingredients after tasting a sample bc it seemed very not-raw, and the first ingredient was peanut butter.  I asked, “Do you use jungle peanuts, since there is no such thing as raw peanut butter?” Peanuts contain aflatoxin, a mold that can only be removed through roasting.  Jungle peanuts are the only type of peanut that don’t have that mold, and are therefore safe to eat raw, but you rarely find them in protein bars.  The rep asked what a jungle peanut was, and I explained.  He then said he didn’t know, but that I could ask the manufacturer.  Upon closer look, the second ingredient was brown rice syrup, which is also a cooked ingredient.  These bars may be organic, but they are certainly not raw in the slightest and should not be marketed as such.  To make me dislike them further, their website just crashed my browser and I nearly had a heart attack when I got logged out of wordpress and thought I lost everything I typed so far on this blog.  Aside: thanks, wordpress, for being so on top of auto-saving.  You rock.





Whether or not these reps knew their products, I can’t say, because they were too busy ignoring us to even say hello.  I tried interacting, but both women just stared at me blankly and didn’t speak.  Though I have bought their products plenty in the past, I am a bit less inclined to do so now.  They were speaking to one another when we walked up, but stopped as I stood there glancing at samples, so it wasn’t as if they were too engaged in their own conversation.  The lack of response to my mentioning that I bought their crackers, and asking if it was ok to take a sample, was the opposite of how a business should behave.  They did not say a single word in reply, though they looked right at me.  I am your customer.  Don’t you know that being too cool to do your job by interacting is going to make me choose a different brand of food next time I’m at the store?

The FrankenFood Award goes to:





I feel the same about this stuff as I do meat from a test tube: progresive idea, but creepy.  EarthSpring Foods has found a way to get the estrogen out of soy, which is great, but again, creepy.  They claim they also remove the phytates, or anti-nutrients, that regular soy is full of.  I don’t personally eat soy, except in small doses of its fermented forms, because of both the phytates and estrogens it is so full of.  So, if you are looking to feed the world soy, this may be a better alternative, and they have numerous forms of it including powder, paste, butter, milk and flour.  But if you are just looking to eat food- regular, real, unadulterated food- you are probably best served avoiding this (as well as most other soy products).

My crowning jewel of the day:





Dr. Andrew Weil was a staple in my 1980s holistic home; my parents had his books, watched him on PBS, etc.  He, along with Dr. Mercola, was one of the first medical doctors to publicize the need for integrative medicine.  I’ve eaten at his restaurant as well, so seeing him there was a total starstruck moment.  Ace insisted I get a photo with him, even though she and I both feel like hell lately and weren’t much in a picture mood.  I also saw Cat Cora, but she was on her way out and the last thing I wanted to do was be invasive and stop her for a photo.

Because my brand wasn’t exhibiting this year, I feel like my attendance was a valuable lesson in how to properly exhibit and interact with customers.  Next year I look forward to Rawk-n-Roll Cuisine hopefully being a vendor at ExpoWest, and plan on doing everything possible to emulate the brands I most enjoyed here.