Author of Two Amazon #1 Best Selling Cookbooks

Greenwashed Green Powder

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Jan 25, 2012 greenwashing , , , , , , , , , 2 Comments

Everyone loves samples (or should, because they are free and fun), and when we visit my mom she always gives us a slew of them from a local store that includes a baggie-full with every special vitamin order.  We came home this past trip with scads of samples, and as always I was excited to leaf through the little packets and discover new healthy goodness.

When I came across a green powder, I was skeptical; green powders tend to taste like poop.  But I am always looking for a good tasting one, so I inspected it more closely, and it was awash in no-no’s.  First, the brand name is “Food Science of Vermont.” “Science” is not generally something I want in my food, and using the state of Vermont to conjure images of nature does not do enough to negate the fact that you’ve put the word “science” in your brand of food.  Next, I noticed that nowhere did it say the ingredients were organic, which is a definite must when dealing with concentrates.  Who the hell wants to eat powdered pesticides?  Apparently Food Scientists think you and I do, but on my end at least, they are wrong.  Then, listed in the “other” ingredients was “natural apple flavor.” Natural flavors are not actually natural, since they are made in labs.  Well, at least the “science” has come into play now.  Lastly, and worst, the first damn ingredient of these “Superior Greens” is SOY LECITHIN.  Not only does the lack of specification that it’s non-GMO mean that it is GMO, since most soy grown in America is, it’s not food, it’s not green, and it surely isn’t superior to much of anything.  Soy lecithin is used commercially as an emulsifier, not a food/ingredient for nutritive value- yet here it is as the #1 component.   That’s when I decided I would not be trying this product out after all, as besides my aversions to FrankenFood I am suffering from severe hormonal imbalance at the moment and the last thing I need is to throw a bunch of estrogen into the mix, which is one of soy’s many evils.

I did go ahead and taste this supposedly-superior not-really-green greens by dipping my finger into the packet, and it tasted like what I imagine Apple Jacks are like.  I think I ate Apple Jacks once, in 3rd grade, at my best friend Jami’s house (they were her favorite cereal), and I was so used to health-food cereals that I didn’t care much for them, even though she had done a lot of leading up to the situation with talk about how pink they turn your milk.  So yes, to the average consumer these might taste ok, though certainly not “delicious” as the package claims, unless you have a propensity for fake apple flavor.

Food Science of Vermont, I declare you guilty of putting out GMO crap under the guise of health food.  I am reminded once again: if you want greens, you’re best served simply EATING them in fresh, natural form.

This is the standard packaging for this offensive product. It is also available as a box of individual packets, one of which was the sample I received.



Comments

  • lauren
    Jan 25, 2012 at 9:09 pm Reply

    You really had apple jacks at our house? Strange – I don’t remember being able to have those sugary cereals!

    1. Ariane
      Jan 25, 2012 at 9:24 pm Reply

      Jami was in love with them! Maybe she was allowed when I spent the night, because it was a special occasion? I had HoneyCombs for the first/only time at your house too, I think.

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